MaxScale binaries are now available

UPDATE: Short story: ignore the next update and read the post. Long story: the original post was a mistake, as explained in the next update. But then, MariaDB released free MaxScale binaries and everything I wrote in the post is now correct.

UPDATE 2016-04-14: It seems that I was mistaken. MaxScale download page is a bit different from MariaDB Enterprise page, and does not explicitly require us to accept terms of use before download. But we accept those terms while creating an account.

So, MaxScale binaries cannot be used in production without paying for MariaDB enterprise. Thanks to the persons who commented this post and pointed my mistake. My apologies to my readers.

I won’t delete this post because I don’t want the comments to disappear, as they express opinions of some community members.

My jestarday’s post Comments on MaxScale binaries followed up a post from Percona’s blog. It had much more visits than any other post I wrote before. It was linked by Peter Zaitsev and Oli Senhauser on social networks. No, this is not a self-advertisement, I’m just saying that the problem I’ve talked about is considered important by the community.

Today, MaxScale binaries are available! Not because of me (obviously), but because MariaDB must have found out that the community badly wants those binaries.

MaxScale 1.4.1 was released today, and it is available from the Database Downloads page on MariaDB.com. You can click on MaxScale and then you can select the version (1.4.1, 1.3.0, 1.2.1) and the system (Debian, Ubuntu, RHEL/CentOS, SLES, both available as deb/rpm or tarball). Registration is required for download, but this is acceptable, as long as the binaries are freely available.

There are no restrictive terms of use. Here is how the copyright note starts:

This source code is distributed as part of MariaDB Corporation MaxScale. It is free
software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the
GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation,
version 2.

The only problem is the lack for a repository – but now that the binaries are freely available, I expect most Linux distros to provide their packages.

I downloaded the Ubuntu 14.04 version on my Mint machine, and everything worked as expected:

fede-mint-0 ~ # dpkg -i /home/federico/Downloads/maxscale-1.4.1-1.ubuntu_trusty.x86_64.deb 
Selecting previously unselected package maxscale.
(Reading database ... 184280 files and directories currently installed.)
Preparing to unpack .../maxscale-1.4.1-1.ubuntu_trusty.x86_64.deb ...
Unpacking maxscale (1.4.1) ...
Setting up maxscale (1.4.1) ...
Processing triggers for man-db (2.6.7.1-1ubuntu1) ...
Processing triggers for libc-bin (2.19-0ubuntu6.7) ...
fede-mint-0 ~ # maxadmin -uadmin -pmariadb
MaxScale> show servers
Server 0x1b7a310 (server1)
	Server:                              127.0.0.1
	Status:                              Auth Error, Down
	Protocol:                    MySQLBackend
	Port:                                3306
	Node Id:                     -1
	Master Id:                   -1
	Slave Ids:                   
	Repl Depth:                  -1
	Number of connections:               0
	Current no. of conns:                0
	Current no. of operations:   0

So, thanks MariaDB! I love software projects that listen to their community needs. This should be a lesson for another company – we all know who I am talking about.

Federico

Comments on MaxScale binaries

I’m writing this post after reading Downloading MariaDB MaxScale binaries, from Percona’s MySQL Performance Blog.

I was already aware about the problem: MaxScale is open source, but the binaries are not free. You can download them and use them for testing, but if you want to use them in production, you’ll need to buy MariaDB Enterprise.

Note that MaxScale Docker images seem to have the same problem. I’ve tried some of them, but all those I’ve tried were running MariaDB Enterprise binaries, so using them in production is illegal (unless you pay).

The alternative is… compiling MaxScale. I had problems in doing so and couldn’t solve those problems myself. From the MaxScale Google Group, I see that Justin Swanhart had the same problems… so I don’t feel particularly stupid for that.

After some questions on that group, 2 posts were published on MariaDB blog:

When I tried them, the first one worked for me, while the former didn’t.

But in any case, even if you are able to compile MaxScale on your Linux/BSD of choice, updates will be a problem. You will need to compile all next releases of MaxScale, which is simply not a viable solution for many companies.

This prevents MaxScale from being as widely used as it could be. The lack of free binaries is a problem. I understand their commercial choice – it is legit, but I don’t agree. First, because open source shouldn’t work in this way. Second, because the lack of free binaries could bring some customers to them, but… most probably, it simply prevents lots of people from trying MaxScale at all.

This would be negative for any software project, in my opinion. But I think that it is particularly negative for MaxScale. Why? Because it is amazingly versatile and writing a new module is amazingly simple. This combination of characteristics would make it greatly benefit from being widely adopted – people could write new modules and distribute them.

Please, MariaDB, reconsider this choice.

Federico

MariaDB/MySQL missing features: View comments

The COMMENT clause

All database components (and database themselves) should have a COMMENT clause in their CREATE/ALTER statements, and a *_COMMENT column in the information_schema. For example:

CREATE PROCEDURE do_nothing()
        COMMENT 'We''re lazy. Let''s do nothing!'
BEGIN
        DO NULL;
END;
SELECT ROUTINE_COMMENT FROM information_schema.ROUTINES;

In fact most database objects have those clauses in MySQL/MariaDB, but not all. Views are an exception.

Comments in code

MariaDB and MySQL have multiple syntaxes for comments. Including executable comments (commented code that is only executed on some MySQL/MariaDB versions).

One can use comments in stored procedures and triggers, and those codes are preserved:

CREATE PROCEDURE do_nothing()
BEGIN
        -- We're lazy. Let's do nothing!
        DO NULL;
END;

But, there are a couple problems:

  • This doesn’t work for views.
  • mysql client strips comments away, unless it’s started with --comments parameter. So, by default, procedures created with mysql have no comments.

So…

Views have no comment. No comments in metadata, no comments in code.

This prevents us to create self-documenting databases. Even if names are self-documenting, we may still need to add notes like “includes sold-out products”, or “very slow”.

Criticism makes us better

As a final note, let me say that this post is not an attack against MariaDB or MySQL. It is criticism, yes, because I like MariaDB (and MySQL). Criticism helps, keeps projects alive, encourages discussions.

To explain what I mean, I’ll show you a negative example. Recently I’ve attended a public talk from a LibreOffice Italia’s guy. It shown us a chart demonstrating that, according a generic “independent American study”, LibreOffice has no bug, while MS Office is full of bugs. The guy seems to think that software lint-like can automatically search for bugs. First I wondered how can LibreOffice survive with a community that is totally unable to produce criticism. Then I realized why it is the most buggy piece of software I’ve ever tried.

Hiding problems is the safest way to make those problems persist.

I’m happy that my favorite DBMS’s get the necessary amount of criticism.

Federico